2.17.2011

Scolded.

Today, as I was walking to Library to pick my class up, I had a celebrity sighting… you know the kind where you’re the celebrity. It happens often when you teach kindergarten, but this one was special. The entire first grade was walking to the cafeteria and a group of about eight of my sprouts from last year were all together.

We have rule in my school… there is no talking in the hallways. It isn’t always followed, but as a teacher, I try to obey. When my friends started shouting my name, I didn’t speak, I just smiled and began patting heads and giving hugs. Apparently the excitement overtook them and they got a little loud… from halfway down the hallway, the lunch monitor in charge of them began shouting… at me.

“Mr. ______, are you causing trouble?!?” She yelled… apparently the irony of her yelling at me for causing noise in the hallway was lost on her.

Always one to follow the rules, I didn’t speak, but only shook my head no and motioned to her that I, unlike her, wasn’t making a peep.

The kids meanwhile looked a little scared. Their beloved kindergarten teacher was being… well, scolded.

She walked closer and gave me a scowl. Yikes. I had officially caused a ruckus in the hallway.

I stopped and gave one more hug to a few of my previous students and dashed into the library to meet my class. The dangers of being loved should never be underestimated.

8 comments:

Ayn Colsh said...

I've taught mine a "secret" signal...I bend my forefinger up and down at them. I tell them that it is a hug and secretly means I love them. When I do see them and they are not supposed to talk, the finger movement reminds them to remain quiet, but also that I recognize their overture and love them, too! It has worked like a charm! :)

Choff said...

As an elementary school counselor I get that a lot in the hallways, especially from our kinders. I also have taught them to just give me a quiet little wave when they see me in the hallway. What I've never been able to fathom, though, is why at dismissal do our hallway patrols yell loudly, "silent dismissal!"

@ele said...

Our rules are to stay on 3rd Street (3rd tile from right side of hallway), hands by your side and walk quietly. I always make it a point to discuss the difference between quietly and silently with students and teachers. Elementary schools should not be silent places...

Amber Gibson said...

we do the 1-finger silent wave, but I also use the "i love you" hand signal, the kids who've ever been in my class know it and send it back at me :)

deborah said...

Oh boy - you are a trouble maker:) I go to three different schools each week and sometimes I feel like a rock star. The kids can really get excited to see me coming and it can make teacher's crazy so we have worked on giving silent hugs because I don't really want to discourage their joy to see me but I don't want to drive their teacher's crazy either:) Secretly, deep down inside, I love it when they all yell my name! The more crazy the better!

Scott said...

I've been a rabble-rouser, too. I volunteer in an elementary school once a week. Sometimes in the hall I see kids I know. So far, we've just waved and I definitely do not talk. But when I arrive at the K classroom where I volunteer, the classroom erupts with calls of my name...and sometimes a "hug stampede." Luckily the teacher allows this.

cara said...

Oh, the excitement the little ones have. I try to encourage a little finger wave.

7718cameron said...

As a "fellow" male Kindergarten teacher, I am viewed as a possible nuisance by colleleges and a Rock Star by classroom critters. I'm first and for most respectful of other adults' needs, but I always put a student's needs first when appropriate. Therefore if someone is insecure with themselves or their management skills, I have no control of that. I hug, wave, and quietly recognize those who want the limelight for 2 seconds. My class walks down the hall in a calm, quiet fashion because that is what I expect from them. Ducktails and bubbles, are too immature for kindergarteners, who view themselves as students equal of the same respect as a fifth grader.